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Please refer the links below for information on the support to you available from your funding agency:. Fees, Funding and Scholarship search. The Key Information Sets provides applicants with statistics about undergraduate life at Oxford. College tutorials are central to teaching at Oxford.


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Skip to main content. Detail of a manuscript in the Bodleian Library. Image credit: Bodleian Library. Last updated. Share This Tweet. Share on Facebook. Share on LinkedIn. Share on Reddit. The course here is so broad, I feel like I'm learning about things I would never have thought to do on my own.

The best thing is probably the amount of freedom we get; we choose which lectures we want to go to, which texts to focus on, and mostly even choose our own essay questions. It means from the start you really get to explore your own interests, but your tutors make sure you're still preparing for broader exam questions through these. The course was a completely different learning experience from school because I was given the freedom to really work out what I thought about texts without having to worry about meeting assessment objectives or covering key themes.

I've left Oxford knowing that I've really explored why I love literature so much and that I've contributed something individual to the study of literature, even if it ends up being just read by me.

Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera (Author of Paris in American Literatures)

A typical week Although details of practice vary from college to college, most students will have one or two tutorials usually two students and a tutor and one or two classes in groups of around 8 to 10 each week. Helpful: A language or History can be helpful to students in completing this course, although they are not required for admission. Careers Our students go on to succeed in a very wide range of careers: the analytical and communication skills that develop during this course equip them for many different paths.

These annual fees are for full-time students who begin this undergraduate course here in Islands Channel Islands and Isle of Man Islands students are entitled to different support to that of students from the rest of the UK.


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Please refer the links below for information on the support to you available from your funding agency: States of Jersey States of Guernsey Isle of Man Overseas Please refer to the "Other Scholarships" section of our Oxford Bursaries and Scholarships page. Contextual information The Key Information Sets provides applicants with statistics about undergraduate life at Oxford. The Oxford tutorial College tutorials are central to teaching at Oxford. At Oxford, everyone is a member of a college as well as their subject department s and the University.

Students therefore have both the benefits of belonging to a large, renowned institution and to a small and friendly academic community. Each college or hall is made up of academic and support staff, and students. Colleges provide a safe, supportive environment leaving you free to focus on your studies, enjoy time with friends and make the most of the huge variety of opportunities. Yes, there's an apparently endless train of literary luminaries who come through to do readings, but what's reassuring is that there are so many people living here who are passionate about writing, and care about it more than nearly anything else.

There's no question that Iowa City, in terms of literary culture, can compete with any major city in the country.

Paris in American Literatures: On Distance as a Literary Resource

They're very supportive of young writers and continue to allow a few to live upstairs in return for some pretty nominal work. Their summer festival is fantastic and exceptionally well run. They're about to award their first Paris Literary Prize, which is a considerable award and reserved for new writers. What's particularly impressive, I think, is that while they host all sorts of established writers, they also allow those who are lesser known to read.

I admire, and am grateful to, any bookshop that's vibrant and alive and seems to have a clear vision for the future. Given their location, and given their history, I think it would have been easy to allow the shop to become a kind of literary Disneyland, but Sylvia Whitman seems determined not to allow that to happen. In Paris, the Village Voice is my favorite. In San Francisco, City Lights. In Seattle, Elliot Bay. I have a tremendous affection for Prairie Lights, which is a genuinely wonderful bookstore.

Or perhaps I'm trying too hard to push your novel—about the distance between desire to act and the courage to do so—into a box that fits the subject of our interview? But the problem is that it's nearly impossible to write about Paris without making some reference to those symbols. Paris itself is a symbol. The word is so freighted, that the minute you type the letters, you're triggering all kinds of literary and emotional associations. Judging by the number of books published each year that have something to do with Paris, it appears that there's no end to the appeal. I was certain that the only way to handle writing a book set in the city was to deal with the gap between what is expected and what is found.

Paris can no more live up to expectations than can one's teacher, or one's father. I don't think you find any more evidence of globalization inside those walls than you do outside them. Gilad complains about ISF early on in the novel, but I don't imagine he'd complain about it now. I'd like to think he's outgrown that adolescent tendency to rail against whatever institution happens to contain him. When I moved to Paris there wasn't a single Starbucks in the city. There are now thirty-nine. This is a real source of anxiety for the French, as well it should be. It goes on and on. America is everywhere in France, and had Gilad been paying attention, he'd have seen it in the street far more often than in the halls of ISF.

Did you go to Paris seeking liberation?

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If so, did you find it? I'm not sure that I went in search of liberation, though I certainly went with wildly romantic notions about what Paris would do for me. I think I stopped being young in Paris. It's a strange thing to say, I guess, but something shifted in those first years. I had promised myself that I would live in Paris before I was thirty, and I moved there when I was twenty-nine. I'd lived in Los Angeles for a long time before moving to Paris and knew a lot of actors who were also pursuing an illusion. I was like one of those women looking out the window, seeing the Hollywood sign for the first time.

I mean, you can't imagine how happy I was to be in France, how certain I was that the city would change everything. There's not a city in the world that could have lived up to what I expected of Paris. That said, I suppose I did find some kind of liberation—it was the liberation of anonymity. I love to be alone, and I've never felt so comfortable being alone anywhere the way I do in Paris. But generally speaking, I don't think Parisians have that same desire to go off and become something else. Some Americans feel embarrassed by their nationality. They have notions, as I did, that by living in European cities we will become somehow "less American," which is to say more sophisticated, more elegant, more cultured.

I've never met anyone embarrassed to be French. The French vacation primarily in France and in former colonies, where they can speak French and eat familiar food.